Jersey Supply – Biz China NFL Jersey Cheap http://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 19:09:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Jersey Supply – Biz China NFL Jersey Cheap http://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/ 32 32 Nuclear power has one last chance to thrive in the United States https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/nuclear-power-has-one-last-chance-to-thrive-in-the-united-states/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 19:09:26 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/nuclear-power-has-one-last-chance-to-thrive-in-the-united-states/ Comment this story Comment Once again, we are on the cusp of a nuclear renaissance. Actually making one requires something that nuclear power isn’t known for: speed. Nuclear power plants produce carbon-free energy, are not dependent on fossil fuels subject to bad things like European wars, and operate at high capacity factors. Hence, in these […]]]>

Comment

Once again, we are on the cusp of a nuclear renaissance. Actually making one requires something that nuclear power isn’t known for: speed.

Nuclear power plants produce carbon-free energy, are not dependent on fossil fuels subject to bad things like European wars, and operate at high capacity factors. Hence, in these troubled and climate-conscious times, the renewed interest. As it stands, the United States is home to the largest fleet in the world, generating 18% of the country’s overall electricity and almost half of its carbon-free electricity. The vast majority were built in two waves in the 1970s and 1980s, with an average age of 36.

There are two sides to an evoked rebirth. One is a breath of fresh air for existing factories. More than 10 reactors have shut down in the past decade, largely because cheap shale gas has driven down electricity prices and booming renewables have also taken hold.

All that has changed. Gas prices hit a 14-year high this summer and 2023 power futures in the Mid-Atlantic region, for example, have risen more than 50% since January. Several states, such as New Jersey and Illinois, instituted subsidies after a chicken party, with plant operators threatening to shut down. The Inflation Reduction Act took this nationwide with a federal tax credit. There is even an additional tax credit for green hydrogen, which existing nuclear power plants can potentially produce in excess electricity or heat.

All this represents a bargain for a set of assets that are by definition rare. It’s no wonder that Constellation Energy Corp., the merchant nuclear arm of Exelon Corp., has more than doubled in value since its January spin-off.

The flip side of this rare asset premium, however, is the reason for the scarcity. The last reactor was commissioned in 2016. Not only was it the first in 20 years, but construction began more than 40 years ago. This is the second, more difficult aspect of rebirth: reviving the lost art of building new factories in the United States.

The fall from grace of nuclear power is often attributed to the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, which stoked public distrust and overzealous regulators. But nuclear was already in trouble. Many projects had been canceled before 1979, partly because it already took a decade to plan, authorize and build a factory(1). Investment costs soared long before Three Mile Island, more than doubling in real terms between 1971 and 1978, flouting the conventional wisdom of larger scale leading to efficiency gains.(2)

The biggest problem, however, was that the world had changed. Nuclear power was first commercialized during the booming 1960s. Electricity consumption jumped 7.3% a year between 1960 and 1973, so utilities rushed to build giant new reactors, hiding the costs by spreading them on taxpayer bills.

The first oil shock in 1973 initially triggered nuclear euphoria. Former President Richard Nixon’s “Project Independence” called for the construction of 1,000 reactors (we peaked at 112). But the oil shock has dampened economic expansion and revived energy conservation. Annual growth in electricity consumption slowed to 3.2% between 1973 and 1978, 2.5% from there to 2000 and only 0.5% since. Meanwhile, rampant inflation, and then blistering interest rates, were a poison for major capital projects.

The bankruptcy of the Washington Public Power Supply System in the early 1980s exemplified this collision of rosy demand assumptions with new economic realities, burdening taxpayers with billions of dollars in costs for half-built abandoned power plants (see this). The same thing happened as recently as 2017 with the abandonment of two unfinished projects in South Carolina (see this). Two other new reactors have also been built in Georgia and should start up next year. But they are far from good public relations; massively over-budgeted and delayed, they owe their completion to regulators who download much of the cost to taxpayers.

Meanwhile, as much as climate change strengthens the case for nuclear power, it has also strengthened the alternatives. Not just renewable energy and batteries, but conservation now enhanced by distributed energy technologies and sophisticated demand management tools. Unlike nuclear power, the cost of these technologies has fallen rapidly.(3)

In building a new plant today, therefore, any developer faces a contemporary version of the same problem that has existed for half a century: how to ensure that the economics of a new project are as favorable when is posted only when it has been proposed. . A conservation miracle and economic upheaval disrupted the 1970s, just as a financial crisis and a shale boom derailed another renaissance hinted at about 15 years ago. Competing cleantech cost trends and all that the 2020s generates is between now and the likely start of new large-scale projects in the 2030s.

This is why the current renaissance is focusing on the development of small modular reactors, or SMRs. These generate perhaps a hundred megawatts – a tenth the size of conventional reactors – or less and could be built in series, like components in a factory, rather than the usual bespoke projects. “You lose efficiency due to smaller scale, but you might gain on mass production,” says Neal Mann, an energy systems engineer at Argonne National Laboratory. Companies such as NuScale Power and TerraPower LLC, founded by Bill Gates, aim to roll out initial commercial projects in the late 2020s.

Above all, that word “modular” offers the enticing prospect of dealing with the recurring problem of taking big bets on plants that won’t light up for years. Although solar and wind projects do not offer dispatchable power like nuclear power plants, they can be built relatively quickly, cheaply, and in stages, depending on changing market conditions.

Although it has been talked about for years, SMRs have not yet arrived. “There are no good cost estimates [for SMRs] because no one actually built any,” says Jonathan Koomey, a researcher studying the costs of energy technologies and co-author of a forthcoming book “Solving Climate Change.” Given nuclear power’s track record, he adds, “what we need is a construction time and cost that we could accurately predict.” more years. That means full-scale commercialization is probably at least a decade away. So what will be the cost of competing technologies?

The point here is not that SMRs are doomed. On the contrary, although they are an obvious potential solution to nuclear power’s biggest problem – that is, its size – they are still fraught with risk. Compare what happened during the stock price of Constellation, capitalizing on the zeitgeist with existing assets, to that of NuScale, trying to build a new future.

So, as with all nuclear power plants built to date, the government must underwrite this risk to some degree. For existing and new plants in Georgia, this meant guaranteed cost recovery for regulated utilities. Today it is grants and grants and development loans.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with that; virtually every energy source has relied on some subsidy or other at some point. But that means this potential revival, like others before it, remains dependent on the often capricious support of society. Energy markets are often described in cycles, with supply and demand and prices rising and falling. Nuclear power is different: the fleet there has remained largely unchanged for decades; it is our emotional relationship with her that waxes and wanes. Typically, discussions of nuclear energy return in the midst of a perceived crisis, whether it’s an oil shock or conflict. It’s like an insurance policy against energy anxiety; which is logical, because taking into account these (unpriced) risks makes nuclear energy appear more competitive.

We are at a time when all the stars have seemingly aligned: climate emergency, energy security concerns, new technologies, new subsidies and government intervention in broader energy markets. The corollary is that, with our networks undergoing fundamental change and net-zero goals hanging over us, if this so-called renaissance does not develop, there is unlikely to be another.

More from Bloomberg Opinion:

• Put the Charcoal in Small Bold Print: Elements by Clara F. Marques

• Big tech investors are done with “science projects”: Conor Sen

• What next for Biden’s green agenda after the midterms? Liam Denning

Want to know more about Bloomberg Opinion? {NOTICE }.

(1) Source: “Special Message to the Congress on the Energy Crisis”, delivered by former President Richard Nixon on January 23, 1974.

(2) The investment costs of nuclear power stations increased by 142% in real terms, on average, between 1971 and 1978, or 13.5% per year. Source: “Rising Power Plant Costs: Nuclear and Coal Capital Costs, Regulation and Economics”, Charles Komanoff (Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1981).

(3) Levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, is a standard way of comparing different sources of generation. It is basically the estimated overall cost of building an energy project per unit of electricity, using long-term assumptions about production, fuel costs, etc. Al. It’s also an imperfect metric, not least because it doesn’t capture things of value like dispatchable capacity – that is, the ability to provide additional power when needed – or, often a carbon price. With all these caveats, however, the underlying cost trend is unmistakable here.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy and commodities. A former investment banker, he was editor of the Heard on the Street section of the Wall Street Journal and a reporter for the Lex section of the Financial Times.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

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Vintage Sale Stables Tuesday Auction 11/15/22 | Dairy Market Reports https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/vintage-sale-stables-tuesday-auction-11-15-22-dairy-market-reports/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/vintage-sale-stables-tuesday-auction-11-15-22-dairy-market-reports/ Paradise, Pa.Nov. 15 2022Report provided by USDA Revenues: 514; Last sale: 534 Compared to last week, demolition slaughter cows sold steadily. Boner slaughter cows sold steady at 1.00 more. Lean slaughter cows sell well. Buyer demand was subdued on a moderate supply for the sale of beef cattle. Feeder dairy calves sold 5.00 to 10.00 […]]]>

Paradise, Pa.Nov. 15 2022Report provided by USDA

Revenues: 514; Last sale: 534

Compared to last week, demolition slaughter cows sold steadily. Boner slaughter cows sold steady at 1.00 more. Lean slaughter cows sell well. Buyer demand was subdued on a moderate supply for the sale of beef cattle. Feeder dairy calves sold 5.00 to 10.00 less. Buyer demand was moderate on a moderate supply for the sale of feeder dairy calves. Vintage Sales Stables has graded 211 feeder dairy calves for sale.

SLAUGHTER COWS: Breakers: 75-80% lean medium coat 71.50-76.50, high coat 78.00-82.00, low coat 66.00-70.50; Boners: 80-85% lean Medium Dress 67.00-72.50, High Dress 73.50-76.50, Low Dress 64.00-66.00; Lean: 85-90% lean Medium dress 61.00-67.50, High dress 68.00-73.00, Low dress 54.00-60.00, Very low dress 46.00-52.00.

FEED DAIRY BULLS: #1: 6 head 85 lb 290.00-320.00 Beef, 5 head 90-95 lb 290.00-320.00 Beef, 3 head 102 lb 137.00, 13 head 100-105 lbs 240.00-300.00 Beef, 9 heads 113 lbs 130.00 , 2 heads 115 lbs 230.00-265.00 Beef, 2 heads 123 lbs 122.00, 1 head 125 lbs 250.00 Beef. #2: 10 heads 83 lbs 150.00, 27 heads 90-95 lbs 140.00-142.00, 3 heads 90-95 lbs 135.00-220.00 Beef, 27 heads 100-103 lbs 135.00, 18 head 114 lbs 127.00, 1 head 115 lbs 24 . #3: 15 head 72 lbs 35.00, 25 heads 83 lbs 147.00, 2 heads 80 lbs 10.00 Jersey, 41 heads 94-95 lbs 132.00-140.00, 16 heads 108 lbs 117.00.

FEED DAIRY HEIFERS: #1: 10 head 80-85 lbs 260.00-320.00 Beef, 3 head 92 lbs 15.00, 10 head 90-95 lbs 235.00-300.00 Beef, 6 head 100-105 lbs 260.00-300.00 Beef. #2: 2 heads 75 lbs 10.00, 2 heads 70 lbs 125.00-140.00 Beef, 5 heads 83 lbs 12.00, 3 heads 80-85 lbs 175.00-230.00 Beef, 5 heads 93 lbs 15.00, 1 head 95 lbs 225.00 Beef, 2 heads 100-105 lbs 190.00-220.00 Beef. UTILITY: 3 heads 62 lbs 5.00.

Price and quality information is reported by the QSA-USDA market news service. Although market reports reflect the majority of livestock sold at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included in this report.

Source: USDA Dept of Ag Market News, New Holland, Pennsylvania. Levi Geyer, John Stacy 717-354-2391. www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/qa_ls183.txt.

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A single mother says the Essex County Pantry has changed her family’s life for the better. https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/a-single-mother-says-the-essex-county-pantry-has-changed-her-familys-life-for-the-better/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 23:15:29 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/a-single-mother-says-the-essex-county-pantry-has-changed-her-familys-life-for-the-better/ NEWARK, New Jersey — There is evidence that a local soup kitchen makes a difference in the community. St. James Food Pantry feeds up to 125 families a day. He gets food from the Community Food Bank of New Jersey, but with rising costs, the pantry now spends $5,000 a month on meat to keep […]]]>

NEWARK, New Jersey — There is evidence that a local soup kitchen makes a difference in the community.

St. James Food Pantry feeds up to 125 families a day. He gets food from the Community Food Bank of New Jersey, but with rising costs, the pantry now spends $5,000 a month on meat to keep up with demand.

CBS2’s Kristine Johnson recently spent time with a mother whose life has changed for the better, in large part because she doesn’t have to worry about her kids going hungry.

Rebecca makes the trip to the St. James Food Pantry once a month.

As she unpacked bags of groceries recently, each item felt like a gift.

“Good apple juice. Kids will love this. Mozzarella and cottage cheese. Make lasagna with this,” Rebecca said.

A surprise is popcorn mixed with a favorite chocolate treat that she knows her kids will devour.

“For me it’s the meat, the chicken. They gave two big whole chickens,” she said, adding that it will feed the whole family.

“You have that chicken and your smile when you know it’s in your freezer and available,” Johnson pointed out.

“Yeah, because, you know, the food is expensive,” Rebecca said.

It’s too expensive for her to make ends meet. She is a single mother. Pictures of her four children hang on the refrigerator door. She is also a survivor of domestic violence and works night shifts as a certified nursing assistant.

“If this service wasn’t there for you, what would life be like?” Johnson asked.

“It would be a bit difficult towards the end of the month,” said Rebecca.

This is when the bills are due and the food in the fridge and cupboards tends to run out.

Rebecca told Johnson the day they spoke that her plan was to cook dinner for her kids that night.

“Oh yeah, because they don’t come home until later. So when they come home, they get a big plate of pasta,” she said.

Vesta Godwin Clarke runs the St. James Social Service Corporation. The center is Essex County’s largest food supplier. Absolutely no one is turned away.

“It’s ministry, when you know you’re doing something to help someone else, even when we were in need, ourselves,” Clarke said.

“They help. They help a lot,” Rebecca said.

And she is grateful. Every tomato and onion she sliced ​​to make this pasta meal, even the spices to flavor the food, came from a mix of funding, donations and volunteers.

Her children, aged 10, 8, 5 and 3, will not go hungry.

But she remembers a time when that was not the case.

“What was that feeling?” Johnson asked.

“Bad, bad. What are you going to do next? You feel really bad. Nobody wants to feel like that,” she said. “Coming here, I had a lot of hope and I pulled myself together and everything like that.

“Where I’m from, you know, domestic violence and all that kind of stuff, it really got to me that people care about it. And they want to help rebuild people,” she added. .

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National Guard service leads to a career in aviation for Krantz https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/national-guard-service-leads-to-a-career-in-aviation-for-krantz/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 08:17:30 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/national-guard-service-leads-to-a-career-in-aviation-for-krantz/ Ron Krantz, Warren, enlisted in the New Jersey Air National Guard in May 1966 and served six years as a weapons mechanic at McGuire Air Force Base. As a weapons mechanic, he was part of the release party responsible for servicing guns, bombs, and rockets and attached to deployed aircraft. A native […]]]>

Ron Krantz, Warren, enlisted in the New Jersey Air National Guard in May 1966 and served six years as a weapons mechanic at McGuire Air Force Base. As a weapons mechanic, he was part of the release party responsible for servicing guns, bombs, and rockets and attached to deployed aircraft.



A native of Long Island, New York, Krantz attended Fairleigh Dickenson University where he attended undergraduate school and was in his second year of graduate school working on an MBA when he enrolled.

“I wanted to fly, but there was no room for me because of my eyes,” he said, noting that at the time pilots’ vision had to be within specific parameters without correction. .

THREE MINUTES LATE

His unit at McGuire, the 105e, had been activated on all previous international conflicts but was not activated during the Vietnam War. He originally intended to enlist in the Atlantic City Guard unit where family ties allowed him to apply there in April 1966, but he arrived three minutes late and did not was allowed to take the test.

He stopped at McGuire and found Sergeant Zimmerman who invited him to come the following Saturday and take the test. He did, and the following Monday he got the call to come and take the oath.

He did his basic training in Texas, then did technical bomb training in Colorado.

While in the National Guard and in graduate school, he had also learned to fly. After completing his training and returning to the East in October, he began applying to airlines and was hired by Eastern. He received an airline class start date in February 1967.

VISION 20/20

“Back then, to fly for the military you had to have uncorrected 20/20 vision, but in the airlines you could have a freshly minted pilot’s license with corrective lenses. It was a supply and demand issue because of Vietnam. There were inexperienced pilots in every airline from 1965 to 1967,” he recalls.

He juggled completing his master’s thesis, National Guard weekends and airline classes and started flying east, which he did for 21 years. He said the flexibility of his daycare allowed him to accomplish these things.

He piloted the entire airline system, flying both domestically and internationally. When Eastern went out of business, he flew for five years for Business Express, then Atlas and Jet Train. After that, he spent 10 years as an FAA inspector.

Before moving full-time to Vermont, Krantz had a long history with The Valley, first skiing here in 1963, buying a condominium in Drumley in 1972, then buying land and building a house.

For a time he flew a glider at Warren-Sugarbush Airport, which he gave up when he bought his own planes as he didn’t want to do both.

When he retired from the FAA in 2006, he kept his plane private for a few years, but then sold it.





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Cities at the Bottom of New York’s Reservoirs https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/cities-at-the-bottom-of-new-yorks-reservoirs/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 11:00:56 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/cities-at-the-bottom-of-new-yorks-reservoirs/ The Catskills Project began with a 12 mile, 8,300 acre strip of land, encompassing the villages of West Hurley, Glenford, Ashton, Olive Branch, Shokan, West Shokan, Boiceville, Brodhead’s Bridge, Olive City, Olive Bridge and Browns station. In its first sip, writes Sante, New York City seized “504 private homes, 35 stores, 10 churches, 10 schools, […]]]>

The Catskills Project began with a 12 mile, 8,300 acre strip of land, encompassing the villages of West Hurley, Glenford, Ashton, Olive Branch, Shokan, West Shokan, Boiceville, Brodhead’s Bridge, Olive City, Olive Bridge and Browns station. In its first sip, writes Sante, New York City seized “504 private homes, 35 stores, 10 churches, 10 schools, nine blacksmith shops, 7 sawmills, and a flour mill.” He also took the Ulster and Delaware Railroad and state forest reserves, thanks to the McClellan Act of 1905, named after George McClellan, then the conservative Democratic mayor of New York. As many have done over the years, Charles Coutant, a member of the Ulster County State Assembly, argued that the city could take its water from the Hudson (like Albany) and spend the money to filter it. He chastised neighboring counties for their support of New York: “If Ulster County is sacrificed”, he reminded them, “your turn may come next”.

A 1950 view of Croton Dam on the Hudson River, Croton, New York.

Frederic Lewis/Getty

But convictions were moving at a rapid pace in 1907, with land seized just before it flooded. Sante notes the condescending tone with which The New York Times covered the farmers’ claims, calling their claims for compensation – for rabbits, for a cow that ate dynamite – “rustically comical”. “But, of course,” Sante writes, “each conviction revealed a specific little narrative.” Sante recreates the world of “small traders, boarders, millers and blacksmiths and quarrymen, ministers and teachers” whose lives have been shattered by land confiscations. Their homes destroyed, they were relocated with their neighbors, an example of what social psychiatrist Mindy Fullilove, writing about the destructive urban neighborhood renewal of the 1950s in the Urban Health Journal, in 2001, defined as “root shock”, a traumatic stress reaction linked to the destruction of one’s emotional ecosystem, although in this case in the countryside. Health writes:

Their connection to the world beyond their own fences was, at best, everyday; few had telephones. The trip to Kingston, less than ten miles away, has been undertaken by most perhaps a few times a year. They spent very little money, consuming mostly things they grew themselves or bartered with a neighbor. But they were not isolated; dense family ties spread throughout the region, and neighbors had been the same for decades. They were bound, pledged and sealed in the land.

Sante sketches the life of a farmer named Charles Pierson: single at 52, whose farm was ideally located, whose family was nearby, who hired laborers from the region at harvest time. He disappears from the record once the town takes over his farm. “There are no reports of illnesses or deaths, emotional crises or suicides following the land seizures, and the term ‘post-traumatic stress disorder’ has been coined for decades,” Sante writes. . “But such suffering must surely have been common. Each determination by the sentencing commission has actually dismantled a life – and at a reduced rate.

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US job growth was weakest in nearly two years in October, unemployment rate up https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/us-job-growth-was-weakest-in-nearly-two-years-in-october-unemployment-rate-up/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 15:01:00 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/us-job-growth-was-weakest-in-nearly-two-years-in-october-unemployment-rate-up/ Non-farm payrolls forecast an increase of 200,000 The unemployment rate is expected to drop from 3.5% to 3.6% The average hourly wage is expected to gain 0.3% WASHINGTON, Nov 4 (Reuters) – U.S. employers likely hired the fewest workers in nearly two years in October and raised wages at a moderate pace, suggesting an easing […]]]>
  • Non-farm payrolls forecast an increase of 200,000
  • The unemployment rate is expected to drop from 3.5% to 3.6%
  • The average hourly wage is expected to gain 0.3%

WASHINGTON, Nov 4 (Reuters) – U.S. employers likely hired the fewest workers in nearly two years in October and raised wages at a moderate pace, suggesting an easing in labor market conditions, which would allow the Federal Reserve to turn to lower interest rate hikes. from December.

The Labor Department’s closely watched jobs report on Friday is also expected to show unemployment rose to 3.6% from 3.5% in September. The Fed hiked interest rates another 75 basis points on Wednesday and said its fight against inflation would require a further increase in borrowing costs.

But the central bank has signaled it could be approaching an inflection point in what has become the fastest monetary policy tightening in 40 years.

“The labor market is basically OK, but it seems to be slowing down,” said Guy Berger, senior economist at LinkedIn.

in San Francisco. “The Fed will try to thread the needle where it is slowing the labor market enough to put downward pressure on wages and inflation, without causing a recession.”

Nonfarm payrolls likely rose by 200,000 jobs last month after rising by 263,000 in September, according to a Reuters survey of economists. It would be the smallest gain since December 2020, when payrolls shrank under an onslaught of COVID-19 infections. Estimates ranged from 120,000 to 300,000.

Employment gains were likely split almost evenly across industry sectors, consistent with recent trends, with the leisure and hospitality industry leading the way. Employment in leisure and hospitality remains below its pre-pandemic level of at least one million jobs. Interest rate sensitive industries such as financial activities and transportation and warehousing likely lost jobs as they did in September. The government wage bill is expected to decline further.

Hurricane Ian is expected to have torn a small dent in the payroll. The storm hit Florida in late September and pushed up unemployment claims in mid-October, when the government polled businesses for last month’s jobs report.

“Hurricane Ian is expected to have at least a downward impact on nonfarm payrolls,” said Lou Crandall, chief economist at Wrightson ICAP in Jersey City. “We’ve lowered our forecast slightly to show an increase of 150,000 (from 200,000) assuming at least some workers were sidelined in areas hardest hit by the hurricane.”

FILLING STATIONS

Job growth remained solid even as domestic demand weakened amid higher borrowing costs as companies replaced workers who would have left. But with rising recession risks, this practice may soon come to an end. A survey by the Institute for Supply Management on Thursday found that some service-sector companies are “holding back from filling vacancies” due to uncertain economic conditions.

However, the labor market remains tight, with 1.9 job offers per unemployed person at the end of September.

Average hourly earnings should have risen 0.3%, matching September’s gain. But there is a risk of an upside surprise from Hurricane Ian as well as a timing quirk. According to Wrightson ICAP’s Crandall, storms and other events that keep people away from work during the payroll survey week can artificially raise the reported level of hourly earnings.

The government surveys businesses and households during the week that includes the 12th day of the month.

“The week of the wage survey included the 15th of the month, which tends to skew the month/month change higher up, since wage increases obtained by workers paid mid-month and end-of-month rather than every two weeks are more likely to have been caught,” said Kevin Cummins, chief U.S. economist at NatWest Markets in Stamford, Connecticut.

By removing all distortions due to the vagaries of weather and calendar, wage growth slows. The average hourly wage is expected to rise 4.7% year-on-year in October after rising 5.0% in September. Other wage measures also came out of the boil, which bodes well for inflation.

“We think we’ve peaked in wage growth,” said Michelle Green, senior economist at Prevedere in Columbus, Ohio. “So while we continue to see year-over-year growth in the average hourly earnings of all private sector employees, the speed of that growth is really starting to slow.”

Reporting by Lucia Mutikani; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Building a solution: opening a plastic-concrete additives plant https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/building-a-solution-opening-a-plastic-concrete-additives-plant/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:06:06 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/building-a-solution-opening-a-plastic-concrete-additives-plant/ Founded in Costa Rica in 2018, CRDC now operates in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, South Africa, Mexico, United Kingdom, New Zealand and Hong Kong. | Image Party/Shutterstock CRDC Global is turning hard-to-recycle plastic into a concrete additive in Pennsylvania and plans to expand across the country as quickly as possible. In mid-October, the company brought its […]]]>

Founded in Costa Rica in 2018, CRDC now operates in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, South Africa, Mexico, United Kingdom, New Zealand and Hong Kong. | Image Party/Shutterstock

CRDC Global is turning hard-to-recycle plastic into a concrete additive in Pennsylvania and plans to expand across the country as quickly as possible.

In mid-October, the company brought its first commercial-scale US installation online in York, Pennsylvania. the question of plastics deserves such objectives.

“We feel very lucky to have a solution that can give a benign end of life to plastics that currently cannot be recycled and end up in landfills,” he said.

CRDC takes plastics and turns them into a structural concrete additive called RESIN8, which reduces weight, slows water absorption and improves insulation.

Build the base

CRDC was founded in Costa Rica in 2018 and now operates in New Jersey, South Africa, Mexico, UK, New Zealand and Hong Kong. The Pennsylvania facility is CRDC’s second commercial-scale plant, Gibby said, but there are three others slated for commissioning soon in Samoa, South Africa and Australia.

The company has partnered with the Alliance to End Plastic Waste in 2021 to help scale up operations. In a Press release, Steve Sikra, Group Vice President and Head of Americas, said plastic waste is a valuable resource that can be harnessed with the right technologies and solutions,” and RESIN8 is one such solution.

“Since we started working with CRDC Global, they have made tremendous strides in improving their process and perfecting their new technology,” added Sikra. “We are proud to travel with them to develop their technology around the world.”

Gibby said CRDC is also focused on reducing transportation as much as possible and estimated that to cover the “wide geographic area” of the United States, the company will likely need around 75 factories.

York, Pennsylvania was chosen as the first large-scale site because of its easy access to markets for building products and construction projects.

“It has major road arteries which make it very accessible,” Gibby said. “The other benefit is that York is widely considered an industrial region, I think because of its location, so we knew the infrastructure would be there to meet our needs.”

York’s facility is a bit smaller than originally planned by CRDC due to available building space. Gibby said CRDC did not want to build a new structure and the timeline to upgrade the building it had chosen with more electrical capacity was almost a year due to supply chain slowdowns.

The plant will have a capacity of 1 tonne per hour, and should therefore be able to produce around 20 tonnes per day. Originally, CRDC hoped to make 25 to 30 tons per day.

“We decided to go with the lower capacity and maximize what we could in that location, and continue to talk to the mayor about the expansion,” he said.

The company has already entered into a few purchase agreements for its additive, with Fizzano Brothers Concrete Products and York Building Products, and is in talks with several other local and national companies, Gibby said.

Additionally, CRDC has a partnership with Georgia-Pacific, which acts as a broker to obtain the company’s raw material, so that CRDC can “focus more on plastic conversion and processing.”

Georgia-Pacific has strong ties to MRFs in the region, Gibby said, which made York a solid option when the company was in the early planning stages. Since then, however, the CRDC has come to realize that mixed bullets from MRFs often contain too many contaminants such as glass and metal to be usable.

“Once it’s baled with all these others, it’s not extractable for us at this point,” he said.

Instead, much of the York facility’s feedstock comes from nearby industrial sources. Gibby said CRDC is also currently receiving plastic for cleanup events from as far away as Alaska, but “it’s temporary because our goal is to have plants everywhere.”

The additive can be made with 1 to 7 plastics, including multi-layered polymers, Gibby said, and can handle some level of organic contamination — like beach sand, river mud, food from municipal waste or paper labels.

The third raw material stream comes from CRDC’s “Bag that Builds” program, which allows residents to deliver plastics to the facility. York residents have responded enthusiastically to this program, Gibby said.

“We were pleasantly surprised by the engagement we got from the community itself,” he said. “If we had gone to a much bigger city, we wouldn’t necessarily have been able to have that much impact in the community or have that much commitment, enthusiasm and passion for what we do.”

Gibby said CRDC never really promoted the bag program, but the local Rotary club heard about it and got involved, spreading the message to other local groups and businesses.

A local business decided that it would become a bag collection point, then the mayor set up three other collection points in the city. Schools got involved and Gibby said people embraced him.

“It’s really gone,” Gibby said. “We have people coming in all day and they don’t just want to drop off the bags, they want to talk and understand what we’re doing with the gear, how it works. Some still doubt that we can take all they can put in the bag, and we educate them.

Seek to expand

Gibby’s goals are to expand across the United States and globally, as there is “considerable interest from island nations that have limited landfill space that inherits a lot of plastic waste on beaches. , and are tourist areas with a lot of visitors who create waste”.

Currently, CRDC is developing domestic partners to help the company expand into the United States “as quickly as possible.” Gibby said the company is currently developing a strategic plan for which locations will come next.

“It’s been a bit mind-blowing, to tell you the truth,” Gibby said. “I think it will grow. It gives people hope. No plastic goes to landfill, none gets burned and it won’t end up in the environment… it goes into the concrete that will help build their own community.

More tech stories

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Gophers women’s basketball plays Wisconsin-River Falls in exhibition https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/gophers-womens-basketball-plays-wisconsin-river-falls-in-exhibition/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 22:08:00 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/gophers-womens-basketball-plays-wisconsin-river-falls-in-exhibition/ In the most practical way, Sunday’s show with Division III Wisconsin-River Falls at Williams Arena means very little to the Gophers women’s basketball team. So why did this game keep Amaya Battle awake at night? “I think about it all the time, actually,” Battle said after practice last week. Battle, from Hopkins, is part of […]]]>

In the most practical way, Sunday’s show with Division III Wisconsin-River Falls at Williams Arena means very little to the Gophers women’s basketball team.

So why did this game keep Amaya Battle awake at night?

“I think about it all the time, actually,” Battle said after practice last week. Battle, from Hopkins, is part of a four-player, all-Minnesota drafting class that also includes Mallory Heyer, Mara Braun and Nia Holloway.

“In fact, if I lay down and think about it, I can’t fall asleep. It’ll keep me awake. It’s so surreal. My last name will be on a Gophers jersey. When they do that chant from Minnesota, they’re going to sing for our team. It’s so exciting. I can’t wait.

In fact, it won’t exactly be a brand new uniform that the Gopher players will be wearing ahead of Sunday’s game at 2 p.m. The team has ordered and expects to get a restyled jersey for the upcoming season — which begins against Western Illinois on Nov. 7 — but those new uniforms have been stalled by supply chain issues.

But you get the idea. For Braun, Battle and Heyer, it will be the first time. Holloway, who is recovering from knee surgery, will have to watch from the bench. But in a squad with 11 new players and just three survivors, there will be a number of players wearing the jersey with their name on the back for the first time, listening to the cheers from Williams Arena.

“I’m super excited for the game,” Heyer said. “I’ve been thinking about playing for the Gophers for a long time. The fact that I’m putting on the jersey for the first time, I’m super excited. It’s such an honor to represent Minnesota State.”

For coach Lindsay Whalen, the most important thing is to get the team used to the routine of game day: getting up early, taking part in shooting sessions, watching a movie, eating as a team. What works and what doesn’t.

“We’re lucky to play a home game,” Whalen said. “To do everything at Williams, I know a lot of our team members are thrilled with their first time there. So yeah, it’s obviously a very exciting time. We’ve been training a lot, so it will be good to go play against someone else.”

The match follows news that aid station player Aminata Zie has been lost for the season due to a leg injury. She underwent successful surgery on Thursday.

The Gophers didn’t have much depth in the position to start. This situation worsened when Holloway was lost for the year due to a knee injury. Zie’s injury only exacerbated the problem.

“Obviously you hate these guys that are out for the year,” Whalen said. “It’s really unfortunate. We have to step in. We’ve had to move people to different positions, things like that. It’s just an unfortunate part of the game.”

Sophomore Rose Micheaux is the starting center. Behind her is Destinee Oberg, a Minnesota native who was traded to the Gophers from Arkansas.

After that, the post’s minutes would likely fall on Heyer. She’s played like a four-way streak for the Gophers so far, doing much of her work on the perimeter in a high-low game with the post. But she might have to slip inside – especially on the defensive end – if circumstances call for it.

For now, however, the biggest emotion is excitement.

“It will be the first time that we will all really play together [in a game]”Bataille said.

Said Heyer: “It will be an opportunity to get rid of some nerves. I’m super excited. But I’m also a bit anxious. It’s just an opportunity to build our team chemistry.”

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Lavallette New Jersey raises the cost of beach beacons in 2023 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/lavallette-new-jersey-raises-the-cost-of-beach-beacons-in-2023/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 15:26:29 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/lavallette-new-jersey-raises-the-cost-of-beach-beacons-in-2023/ I understand supply chain issues may be driving up the cost of chicken, but it’s getting a little out of control! If you’re planning on spending some time at the beach next summer, you’re going to have to dig a little deeper into your pocket. Last week, I told you about this popular Atlantic County […]]]>

I understand supply chain issues may be driving up the cost of chicken, but it’s getting a little out of control!

If you’re planning on spending some time at the beach next summer, you’re going to have to dig a little deeper into your pocket.

Last week, I told you about this popular Atlantic County beach town about to raise the prices of its beach tags, and we’ll see that happen in Ocean County as well.

Photo by Kenny Eliason on Unsplash

Photo by Kenny Eliason on Unsplash

Now I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t really mind paying to use the beach.

I know I’m crazy but I’ll elaborate.

When I first moved to Seaside Heights as a full-time resident earlier this year, I remember meeting a guy who was from North Carolina.

We were both walking towards the boardwalk, I was going for a beer and he was getting ready to go to the beach.

When we approached the boards he saw all the places selling beach tags and was absolutely bowled over when he found out he had to pay to use the beach.

Apparently, where he was from in Carolina, the beaches are free, and you can just walk around and relax for the day.

I’ve been to a few beaches in Carolina, they weren’t bad at all, but they don’t compare to the Jersey Shore in my opinion.

Photo by Tommy Fawcett on Unsplash

Photo by Tommy Fawcett on Unsplash

Like I said, I don’t mind paying to use the beaches as that money is usually pushed back into town.

Whether it’s for maintenance, salaries for lifeguards, or general improvements, the money from our beach beacons generally helps our beach towns.

That being said, times are tough for everyone, and paying extra for labels, even if it’s only five or ten bucks, can be a big hassle.

So which Ocean County beach town is increasing the cost of beach beacons in 2023?

I visit this town frequently, it has one of my favorite bars on the island and one of my favorite ice cream parlours, and my family stays there every year for vacation.

According to Shorebeat Lavallette Beach increase its prices;

For the 2023 season, holiday badges will be $55, pre-season badges will be $60, and regular-priced badges will be $65. Daily badges will increase by $1, at a cost of $13.

So if you wanted to take a family of four to the beach for the day in season, it would cost you $52, and for four seasonal badges, it would be $260!

Photo by Alexander Mils on Unsplash

Photo by Alexander Mils on Unsplash

So far I haven’t heard anything about other beach towns raising beach tag prices, but if you hear anything please let me know, email me at douglas.buehler@townsquaremedia.com .

The New Jersey Beach Commandments: Beach Do’s and Don’ts

Stunning New Jersey Mansion on the Beach, Best on the East Coast

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Boo-yah! Jersey City a hotbed for Halloween, according to ranking https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/boo-yah-jersey-city-a-hotbed-for-halloween-according-to-ranking/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 20:27:00 +0000 https://bizchinanfljerseycheap.com/boo-yah-jersey-city-a-hotbed-for-halloween-according-to-ranking/ It’s official, Jersey City is scary! According to digital financial services company WalletHub, the city was named the seventh best in the country for Halloween, based on comparisons between trick-or-treat friendliness, Halloween fun and Halloween weather. From masquerade parties at bars and restaurants for the 21-plus kid in all of us to trunk or treat […]]]>

It’s official, Jersey City is scary!

According to digital financial services company WalletHub, the city was named the seventh best in the country for Halloween, based on comparisons between trick-or-treat friendliness, Halloween fun and Halloween weather.

From masquerade parties at bars and restaurants for the 21-plus kid in all of us to trunk or treat festivities for the youngsters, Jersey City has no shortage of Halloween spirit. So many in fact, that the celebration spans two or three weekends.

Unsurprisingly, New York was No. 1, followed by San Francisco (whose MLB team wears what amounts to Halloween outfits in terms of colors). Newark came in at No. 37.

Jersey City was ranked second for friendliness of tricks or treats, 59th for Halloween fun, and 92nd for weather. Where Jersey City stood out was the average price per Halloween party ticket, where it was the highest in the country. The city was also third in “walking score”, 13th in “crime rate”, and 12th in percentage of fully vaccinated residents.

The number of Halloween costume stores, party supplies stores, and candy and chocolate stores per capita, as well as the number of Halloween parties were among the 22 metrics WalletHub used to establish its score for every city.

A look at the Jersey City Cultural Affairs Calendar shows six events, including the Jersey City Police Department’s Trunk-or-Treats, between Oct. 27 and Halloween, Oct. 31. And hyperlocal community blogs provide long lists of Jersey City events.

Some Halloween facts and figures provided by WalletHub:

  • $10.6 billion: Projection of Halloween spending in 2022.
  • $3.6 billion: Spending on Halloween costumes in 2022.
  • $3.1 billion: Spending on Halloween candy in 2022.
  • 34%: Share of parents who think that 13 or 14 years old is old enough to make sweets or treats alone.
  • 86%: Share of parents who admit to stealing candy from their children.
  • $300 million or more: Annual revenue from ticket sales for haunted attractions, 80% of which is managed by charities.
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