Greg Gutfeld: The media don’t care about the truth when there is a good story


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So he lied about helping a homeless vet – and now owes a big debt.

It was a kind gesture that anyone could applaud – but it turned out to be a giant fraud.

This week, a man from New Jersey – aren’t they all – pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit wire fraud in a case that has captivated the country.

In fact, it has captivated a naive media that will believe anything that matches its assumptions.

But if any of you heard that story, you knew it was as wrong as Kim Kardashian’s ass. Or half of her buttocks.

In 2017, Mark D’Amico and his ex-girlfriend concocted quite a story to raise money for a homeless man using GoFundMe – the same site that shut down the Rittenhouse advocacy fund, if you like to keep a trace.

D’Amico claimed that hapless veteran Johnny Bobbitt Junior gave them his last 20 dollars for gasoline.

They then launched a GoFundMe campaign to pay him back and raise money to get the veteran off the streets.

Kind of like what Joe did for Hunter in China.

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So, of course, the media picked up on the story and covered it as the heartwarming story it seemed to be.

ANCHOR ABC: An act of kindness from a veteran is now gaining national attention.

KATE MCCLURE: How about we run a GoFundMe for this guy? We put it in the car on the way home.

ANCHOR ABC: You go from zero, literally, to 300 and a few thousand dollars.

JOHNNY BOBBITT: It’s like winning the lottery.

MSNBC ANCHOR: Johnny Bobbitt was unlucky. But this morning, after a random act of kindness, thousands of people came together to help the homeless veteran with a heart of gold.

ANCHOR ABC: A homeless veteran, living on the streets of Philadelphia, teaching an entire nation what it means to give.

Either way, it turned out to be as heartwarming as a stent filled with hot bacon grease.

Yes, like the Nigerian prince who said he wanted to marry me and give me a dowry of $ 25 million, the story was too good to be true.

(I flew to meet him in Amsterdam, and he held me up. I had a hard time getting these goats back through customs.)

It turns out they made it all up and defrauded over 14,000 donors out of $ 400,000.

The money that paid for vacations, a BMW, clothes and other stuff. Maybe a painting or two from Hunter Biden.

Meanwhile, Bobbitt was back on the streets and saw only a fraction of the money raised.

It turns out that GoFundMe has become “fuck yourself”.

In 2019, the ex-girlfriend and the homeless man pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud for their involvement and are awaiting conviction.

Well he won’t be homeless then I guess.

As for D’Amico, he faces 20 years in prison and a $ 250,000 fine, and possibly a CNN job upon his release, where hoaxing is the model for profit no matter how many people it harms.

So what’s the lesson here?

That if a story is too much on the nose – it’s complete crap.

Back when this story happened, we made it as “One More Thing” on “The Five,” which means we probably haven’t watched it that closely.

We were too busy combing Geraldo’s mustache.

It takes at least four hours and 12 men. Looks like a weekend.

But we live in a media landscape where if someone wants a story to be real, they’ll assume it’s real.

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Each story is brought to life by a fake story from a journalist who feels good telling it.

It could have been the Covington kid, the Kavanaugh audiences, the Kyle Rittenhouse story.

The point is, there are no more facts when stories are told.

The Steele dossier captivated a whole slew of biased cognitive idiots – and while the facts kept falling apart, they clung to it like Stelter on a donut.

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They wanted to believe so much that prostitutes were peeing on Trump that they were happy to poop on the truth.

And it was the American public that got stuck with the dirty laundry.

This article is adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s opening monologue in the November 26, 2021 edition of “Gutfeld!”


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